Category Archives: Nepal

New projects May 2017 – Nepal

 

FogQuest is providing technical and material assistance to a team from Engineers Without Borders (student chapter, University of Colorado) who will set up four SFC’s in the Kalinchowk region on Nepal, an area that was badly damaged by the earthquakes of two years ago and is in need of water.

The Canadian NGO, Nepal Community Development Foundation is also assisting.  A small team will depart from the U.S. this month and will spend two months in the region.  We will post any updates and news we receive on our web site and in further editions of our newsletter.

Update on Nepal project

The Silauti SFC project has run for six months. The past three months have been very dry but cold weather and have reduced the overall yield to approximately 4.5 litres/meter/day as an average. The data has been split into wet and dry seasons and we can see that the winter, while there’s abundant fog, is not getting the yields that we were seeing in the transitional seasons and summer. Winter data is about 1 litre/day on 1 square meter.

The monitoring equipment has not only been able to survive the location’s climate and conditions, it’s also been recording the data without incident over the past six months.

The data shows an average collection rate of 4 to 5 litres/meter/day. Placement of the collector and the presence of turbulence from the trees on the downward side of the ridge may be factors in the overall results.

The SFC has now been moved to a saddle ridge on the nearby military base for the next six months. This location is 2km from the temple at Silauti and we’re expecting to be able to compare results from the two locations over a full dry and wet season. The ridge is crisscrossed by alternating prevailing winds that bring large, dense banks of fog into the area. The altitude at the new location is similar to the temple at just under 2800m.

Our next newsletter will have more updates on this pilot project

New Data Logger being tested

This watertight case contains the circuit boards that generate the data stream. It is also Bluetooth enabled, allowing the observer to access the data without having to open it and retrieve a data card.
This watertight case contains the circuit boards that generate the data stream. It is also Bluetooth enabled, allowing the observer to access the data without having to open it and retrieve a data card.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In order to determine how much water has been collected by a Standard Fog Collector, or indeed any fog collector, one needs a regular record of the water produced. The low cost way to do this is to have an observer measure the amount of water in a container each day. This has advantages and disadvantages. It is something that is discussed in our manual. In locations where it is safe to put instrumentation out with the SFC we have used various measurement techniques over the years. There is always a trade-off between performance and cost. We need low cost and durable data loggers.

The automated data collector is powered by this solar panel. This remarkable and efficient solar panel is courtesy of Voltaic Systems: (www.voltaicsystems.com).
The automated data collector is powered by this solar panel. This remarkable and efficient solar panel is courtesy of Voltaic Systems: (www.voltaicsystems.com).

Byron Bignell, who recently returned from Nepal (as noted below) the spent considerable time and effort developing a new data logging system. We are presently testing this in Nepal and in Kamloops, British Columbia. When we have some definitive results we will present them on this website and in our newsletter.

The single fog collector (SFC) can be seen here temporarily placed on its side to enable access to the top frame bar.  The solar panel is mounted at the top of the unit.
The single fog collector (SFC) can be seen here temporarily placed on its side to enable access to the top frame bar. The solar panel is mounted at the top of the unit.
The new and complete assembly can be seen here.
The new and complete assembly can be seen here.

 

 

Pilot project in Nepal continues

DSCF1440In May of this year FogQuest volunteer Byron Bignell returned to update a pilot project (2013) in the Ilam district of eastern Nepal. This was just after a series of earthquakes had resulted in widespread casualties and damage throughout the country.

The eastern district had been spared the worst tremors and experienced only minor damage.  Thankfully this project was not damaged and is currently operational. Once the collection data have been retrieved and analyzed the decision whether to move forward with a larger system will be made.

An update to this project will be included in our next newsletter.